On June 24 Royal Mail will issue a miniature sheet of four stamps in memory of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who died on April 9 at the age of 99.

Having married Princess Elizabeth in November 1947, Philip gave up a stellar career in the Royal Navy when she ascended the throne as Queen Elizabeth II in February 1952. He would become the longest-serving royal consort in British history, supporting the monarch in all her work until his retirement from royal duties in 2017.

During more than half a century in the public eye, he accompanied her on more than 250 overseas tours and completed more than 22,000 official engagements.

He also became patron or president of some 800 organisations, and founded the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme in 1956 to encourage millions of young people around the world to challenge themselves, help their communities and learn new skills.

The pared-down designs are based on black-and-white photographs of Prince Philip through the years, each with the dates ‘1921-2021’ and a black border.

Designed by Kate Stephens and Royal Mail Group, the miniature sheet was printed in litho by ISP, and is available in an uncut press sheet of eight.

 

2nd class

Portrait of a young Prince Philip by the court photographer Baron (Stirling Henry Nahum) in the late 1940s.

1st class

Prince Philip in military uniform, attending his son Prince Andrew’s passing-out parade at Dartmouth Naval College in Devon in 1980.

£1.70

Prince Philip in casual attire at the Royal Windsor Horse Show in the 1980s.

£2.55

Portrait of Prince Philip in later years, taken by the society photographer Terry O’Neill in 1992.

 

PRICES

Miniature sheet   £5.76

Presentation pack   £6.65

Press sheet   £50.65

Stamp cards   £2.25

First day cover   £7.55

 

VERDICT

COMMEMORATIVE WORTH   5/5

It’s just a pity that fate turned this from a 100th birthday issue into a memorial issue

QUALITY OF DESIGN   4/5

Simple monochrome portraits strike the right chord, and evoke some of the Duke’s personality

WOW FACTOR   3/5

The mood is sombre rather than striking, but many will appreciate the tone of the issue