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My Queen Wilhelmina Collection

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Adrian01/12/2012 10:07:06
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I enjoy reading Robbo's thread of his Lakatois collection immensely and think we should all showcase our collections here, no matter how basic or specialised it is. And so, to practise what I preach, I will here start a thread on my Queen Wilhelmina collection.

It's rather big in that it stretches from 1891 to 1950, including all stamps which portray Wilhelmina, of the Netherlands and the overseas territories.

I will not attempt to put aything in any chronological or other logical order, but will just add here what I am adding to the collection, hoping you'll enjoy seeing it and reading about it!

So let me start with the 'Widow's Cap' definitives of Surinam. The basic set dates from 1936 and portrays Wilhelmina in white mourning (she chose white to show her hope of her late husband going to a better place, where he would hopefully conduct himself more gracefully!).

After WW2, the 10c value was surcharged several times, and my latest additions are a number of 7.5c on 10c stamps.

There are a number of overprint subtypes, and on this pair we have one of them. Look at the fraction bars and you'll see that the bar on the right-hand stamp has dropped.

12e.jpg

Here is a copy with the whole overprint (normal fraction bar) shifted and slightly slanted. You can just about see the end bit of the 7 on the right-hand side.

12d.jpg

Another subtype consists of the thick bar obliterating the old value being split into two. This copy here also has the dropped fraction bar.

12f.jpg

These are fairly common stamps so you may well have a couple of them in among your assorted lots.

Julia Lee01/12/2012 11:53:47
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'Conduct himself more gracefully'? Sounds like there's a story there.

Adrian01/12/2012 11:59:51
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Hey, it's Saturday!

Apparently and allegedly, and of course I wasn't there so don't shoot me if I'm wrong, but though the marriage started out nicely enough, within years there was not much love lost between Wilhelmina and her Hendrick, and he loved his wild boars and his wild women and his easy lifestyle a little bit too much to her liking...

Even though the nation was then still lacking any tabloid type news coverage, word did get out of course, earning Hendrick the popular nickname of Prince Pig.

Julia Lee01/12/2012 12:02:24
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Just sorting out my email in a quiet period - and intrigued!

Love 'Prince Pig'. What a great name.

Reminds me of King Edward's VII's wife Queen Alexandra, who when he died said 'Now at least I know where he is.'

Adrian11/01/2013 11:26:59
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When the Japanese occupied the Netherlands Indies in World War Two, they overprinted all the stamps they could lay their hands on. Provisional overprints, semi-general overprints, and general overprints, they fill a whole catalogue.

But most amazing of all are the Dutch Wilhelmina stamps with a Japanese overprint. Now the Japanese never came anywhere near the Netherlands so why these Dutch stamps with Japanese overprint?

Well, post offices in the Netherlands Indies usually kept a small stock of Dutch stamps as well. The Dutch colonials could buy those and send them along with their own mail to the Netherlands, as a 'reply-postage paid' gesture.

The Japanese, not fussed about which stamps they overprinted, applied their overprints on these Dutch stamps as well.

Seeing that they were only stocked in small quantities, they're quite uncommon, and I only have one example:

11b.jpg

This is the 12.5ct with a semi-general small violet Dai Ni Hon Yubin overprint at the top, used in Riau, the West Coast province and Jambi, in combination with a provisional black cross overprint of Riau and the West Coast province.

I was reminded of them because some guy in the Netherlands is working on a publication on these and asked for illustrations. He's hoping to find proof of actual use of these stamps, for up to now it is assumed they were never postally used.

Needless to say I couldn't help him there...

smiley

Julia Lee11/01/2013 11:30:33
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Not the clearest overprints in the world, are they? How were they done? Type? Handstamp?

Adrian11/01/2013 11:42:37
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These were all handstamped. All provisional and semi-general overprints were applied by hand. That's why there's so many of them because almost each and every post office made their own handstamps.

Even the first general overprints were still applied by handstamp, and it was only at the very end of the overprinting period that the Japanese finally got their act together and started overprinting the stamps properly.

11c.jpg

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