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Member postings for Fred Sellars

Here is a list of all the postings Fred Sellars has made in our forums. Click on a thread name to jump to the thread.

Thread: Ultra violet radiation of multiple crown Wilding definitives.
18/09/2019 15:26:17

You will also find in the CREAM Vs WHITE thread a scan of the 10d phosphors which gives a chalk and cheese comparison.

The ones on the left are on a cream type paper but on the other side there is a much whiter version and the irony is that the catalogues are unable to differentiate between the two, stating that both are on the same type of paper.

This whiter paper only with effect from 1962 appears to be a bit of a farce in my estimation.

Here is a scan previously posted of the above.

What is your estimation on the subject ?

img_20190715_103555.jpg

Edited By Fred Sellars on 18/09/2019 15:28:29

Thread: French perforation shift of the 50 centime "sower" .
18/09/2019 11:51:01

According to some literature that I have recently read,this 50 centime vermilion type ll was produced in rotary sheets, second booklets and second rotary booklets.

From which of these origins does it come from ?

I recently sent a scan of this stamp to the RPSL to get an answer, but the reply from an unnamed person on the expert committee could only confirm that the stamp is a mis-cut one (possibly from waste material) and has no particular philatelic significance.

I am sure that his comments does not bode well with some collectors of France who may have similar items in their collection.

So I whisper a fond adieu as far as this variety is concerned, Fred.

Edited By Fred Sellars on 18/09/2019 11:57:07

Thread: Ultra violet radiation of multiple crown Wilding definitives.
17/09/2019 15:03:11

What is it that distinguishes a stamp printed on a cream paper from one printed on whiter paper ?

In order to come to any conclusion one needs to assess as to how the paper was produced in the first place.

If you compare a stamp printed on cream paper against one on whiter paper you will notice that there is very little difference (if any) between the two under normal visible light.

Wikipedia defines the visible spectrum as being the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye, responding to wavelengths from around 380 (violet) to 740 (red) nanometres.

Visible light can be broken down into 7 different colours (the rainbow effect) as seen through a prism.

Light is basically a reflection from the object that a particular light source has fallen upon.

There are large areas of the electromagnetic spectrum that are not visible to the human eye, at one end there is the non-ionising section comprising of radio, micro and infrared waves. On the other there is ultraviolet (meaning beyond the violet in Latin) and also X-ray and gamma rays, all of which are ionising.

Prior to 1962 British stamps were printed on a cream paper but from 1962 optical brightening agents (OBA'S) were added during the production of the papers to be used for various reasons to print the Wilding stamps.

When ultraviolet radiation at a certain wavelength is shon onto these stamps they emit an ionising effect showing a glow or fluorescent reaction in a darkened environment, however, cream papers do not react.

Therefore, I have used this as a benchmark in my study of papers used since 1962 to print the Wilding definitives as it would appear that in some cases OBA'S have been omitted during the papers production.

One glaring example is the 4d deep ultramarine from booklets and sheets issued in 1965 that can be viewed in my posting of "Cream Vs White".

Thread: 3 papers used to print m/c Wildings
14/09/2019 16:03:24

If some of the viewers have come across any of these variations that I have discovered and illustrated, I would like to hear from them on any of the following subjects.

Cream and whiter papers issued post 1962 relating to the 1d-1/6d Wildings.

Fibrillous papers (FIB'S) issued post 1962 Wilding phosphors.

Thanking you in anticipation,

Fred.

Thread: CREAM Vs WHITE
14/09/2019 15:54:20

If some of the viewers have come across any of these variations that I have discovered and illustrated, I would like to hear from them on any of the following subjects.

Cream and whiter papers issues post 1962 relating to the 1d-1/6d Wildings.

Fibrillous type papers (FIB'S) post 1962 Wilding phosphors.

Thanking you in anticipation,

Fred.

Thread: Meet the "FIB'S"
14/09/2019 15:45:05

If some of the viewers have come across any of these variations that I have discovered and illustrated, I would like to hear from them on any of the following subjects.

Cream and whiter papers issued post 1962 relating to 1d-1/6d Wildings.

Fibrillous papers (FIB'S) post 1962 of Wilding phosphors .

Thanking you in anticipation,

Fred.

Thread: Multiple crown Wilding phosphors with variations.
12/09/2019 11:26:48

img_20190911_005751.jpgimg_20190911_010842.jpgI can now include additional values showing phosphor variations, if you have also noticed the difference on some of your stamps of this period please make contact, as this is what a forum is all about.

Thank you, Fredimg_20190911_010058.jpg

08/09/2019 23:44:07

img_20190908_224522.jpgFurther to my thread posted on the 29/8/19, I can now show you additional scans highlighting the difference between matt and glazed phosphor bands on the Wilding definitives, both of which are 9•5mm violet phosphors.

I took two scans and reversed their positions in order to get equilibrium,and it can be clearly seen that there is a difference between the bands.

The 10d showing a glazed or silky finish with the 1/- value having a matt finish.

Have two different phosphors been used or have they been applied differently ?

All I can do is show you the difference,if anyone seeing the differences with any technical knowledge can explain the variances I would be most grateful for the information.

Thank you, Fred.

img_20190908_223922.jpg

Thread: French perforation shift of the 50 centime "sower" .
07/09/2019 18:26:12

There are four types of this particular stamp with a lined background that depict the Sower (Semeuse).

On looking at the characteristics of this 50 centime red with the perforation shift I note the following:-

1) The lower eyelet of the letter B of République is larger than the upper one.

2) The eylets of the letter A's in Française are very small.

3) The eylet in R of République is larger than the eyelet of R in Française.

Therefore,based on these findings it is a type 2 stamp.

Thread: 3 papers used to print m/c Wildings
02/09/2019 10:46:20

I am number one one of the three amigos , I cover all three paper types, cream, whiter and of course the FIB'S.

Olé !

Edited By Fred Sellars on 02/09/2019 10:56:56

Thread: CREAM Vs WHITE
02/09/2019 10:43:20

Hey hombres and señoras ,

I am cream and whiter papers and number two of the three amigos .

Olé !

Edited By Fred Sellars on 02/09/2019 10:57:49

Thread: Meet the "FIB'S"
02/09/2019 10:39:47

Hey hombres and señoras ,

I am fibrillous papers and number three of the three amigos, we like to stick around together.

Olé !

Edited By Fred Sellars on 02/09/2019 10:58:49

Thread: French perforation shift of the 50 centime "sower" .
31/08/2019 17:27:16

When this stamp was perforated there must have been an inscription in the top margin of the sheet and due to the error in perforating it has included the inscription "ILLUSTREE" on the stamp.img_20190831_171024.jpg

Thread: Multiple crown Wilding phosphors with variations.
29/08/2019 21:27:50

img_20190822_112047.jpgimg_20190823_110852.jpgI was recently checking through some Wildlings sorting the plain from the phosphor ones and noticed that some of the bands on the phosphor stamps could hardly be seen where on some others they appeared quite blatant and had a matt finish, however, others showed a more silky finish and in some cases you could hardly see them at all when comparing the same values.

I realise that there are various methods of applying the bands such as photogravure, letterpress (typo), flexography where some bands being as "varnished", in fact it's quite a mystery to most general collectors of this issue.

Showing you examples is sometimes the best means of contact with three initials scans then I can let you see.

One picture is the difference between photo and typo on the 4•5d value, apparently the photo printed bands have the same width in the margins of the rest of the sheet but letterpress (typo) bands have a narrow band on both margins on either side of the sheet due to the way they were printed.

The other two is of the 4d and 7d showing both a matt and silky finish.

Can anyone account for the differences on both the 4d and 7d stamps as this anomaly seems to occur on several other values also.img_20190823_113140.jpg

Thread: CREAM Vs WHITE
25/08/2019 14:09:56

img_20190825_124954.jpgimg_20190825_131239.jpgWelcome ! One and all to the cream and white show.

My latest posting evolves round the 9d violet phosphor showing the "frame break" and it's repaired version, both printed on a whiter paper.

However there is a darker presence in their midst in the form of cream paper varieties.

I don't think I need to explain the difference, as every picture tells its own story.

Enjoy !img_20190825_132809.jpg

22/08/2019 13:46:48

In my study of papers to start with, one must look for a common thread appertaining to cream and whiter type papers found from many different countries issuing these stamps with these variances, and that main factor is the inclusion of optical brightening agents (OBA's) when the paper was first produced and another thing is to why it was introduced in the first place .

In the late 1950s automatic sorting of postal items was still in its infancy and various experiments were carried out with the introduction of graphite lines on the reverse of some of the lower value definitives, apparently they were not very successful and in 1958 stamps with phosphor bands and phosphor coating were experimented with in what is known as the " Dollis Hill trials " using yellow and green type reacting phosphors on the front of the stamps using 2d and 3d values, and for one reason or another the green phosphor was selected .

Eventually, the graphite lines were discarded and phosphor stamps were introduced .

All this was done so that letters could be sorted automatically via machine rather than by hand .

It was then decided in 1962 to add OBA's into the production of papers either in the wet stage when the paper was just pulp or at a later stage when a coating could be applied to the surface of the paper as a cost saving method .

In my opinion this was done to enhance the proficiency of the automatic sorting machines used at that time,and the use of whiter papers was proclaimed by the post office stating that only whiter papers would be used from 1962 onwards .

However, it would seem that many values issued since 1962 have been found printed on a cream type paper, leading to the fact that optical brightening agents were omitted when the paper was initially produced .

The above relates to British stamps but the overall picture could also apply to other countries that have issued stamps with OBA's incorporated into the paper .

You can view some information on the " Dollis Hill trials " on YouTube under stamp collecting via Mark Bloxham stamps ltd.

 

Edited By Fred Sellars on 22/08/2019 14:02:49

Thread: 3 papers used to print m/c Wildings
19/08/2019 10:18:54

img_20190818_210528.jpgI am now coming to the conclusion that 3 papers do exist with regards to the multiple crown watermark namely :- Cream papers : Whiter papers : Fibrillous papers .

After excluding the halfpenny type values, it would seem that the majority of values between 1d to 1/6d all seem to have the three types of papers mentioned in my articles so far issued.

This is not just a coincidence but a fact.

Here are some 3d values again for comparison, comprising of cream and whiter type papers including fibrillous ones .img_20190818_205718.jpg

Thread: Meet the "FIB'S"
19/08/2019 09:59:59

img_20190818_211025.jpgAfter finding fibrillous papers on one particular stamp you start to look at other values of the same issue to see if it was just a one-off occurrence.

From my findings so far it would appear that this is not the case ,as I have found the majority of the multiple crown issues to have similar characteristics. Here is the 3d violet centre band with small fibres depicted in the paper and apparently on cream and whiter type papers also .img_20190818_205718.jpg

Thread: CREAM Vs WHITE
19/08/2019 09:26:01

img_20190818_210528.jpgIsn't it surprising, when you start looking for something specific in philately you tend to find it, once you have found a particular example such as cream type papers issued long after the 1962 period of change over.

It would appear that in some cases optical brightening agents were omitted during the production of some of the papers used for the multiple crown watermark long after the change over date.

Here is another example for comparison, showing the difference between the two types of paper produced around 1966 of the 3d violet phosphor centre band .

img_20190818_211025.jpg

Thread: Multiple crown Wildings printed on reversed " laid paper " .
17/08/2019 08:56:00

One could argue that the ribbing when as prominent as this could be classified as a secondary watermark which compliments the multiple crown impression in the paper that was made at a slightly later time whilst still in the wet stage .

The ribbing in the laid paper was created by almost the same method as the watermark itself but not usually as prominent as the ones shown in these pictures.

If anyone can contribute to my findings I would appreciate it very much.

Thank you,Fred .

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